The Conjuring

The Conjuring is a horror movie that was based on true story. The story was lifted from the case files of Ed and Lorraine Warren. Though, most people have probably already watched the film, it is better to give them some insight regarding the things that truly happened before the film was made.

THE PERRON FAMILY

The real-life Perron family lived in a farmhouse in Harrisville, Rhode Island for about ten years. The house was bought by the couple, Roger and Carolyn Perron in 1970. The farmhouse came with a 200-acre property and was a perfect place for raising the couple’s five daughters: Andrea, Nancy, Christine, Cynthia, and April. The family moved out from the house in 1980.

LORRAINE WARREN AND THE REAL PERRON FAMILY ON THE CREATION OF THE MOVIE

Lorraine Warren actually approved the creation of the movie and she served as consultant during its filming. She was also seen on the North Carolina set of the production.

The Perron family also supported the film’s production, which they had also done with Andrea Perron’s book (House of Darkness House of Light), which came out in 2011. Some members were also seen on the set during the production, including the talkative Andrea and Christine, who was more hesitant to share some of her experiences.

THE REAL BATHSHEBA SHERMAN

The haunting spirit of the supposed witch, Bathsheba Sherman, was featured in the movie. Bathsheba’s real name was Bathsheba Thayer and she was born in Rhode Island in 1812. The woman married a man named Judson Sherman in Thompson, Connecticut on March 1844. The couple had a son named Herbert L. Sherman. The couple supposedly had other children who were assumed to have died before the age of seven though no records of them could be found.

The only photograph of Bathsheba was founding the Perron farmhouse in 1885.

There is no proof that Bathsheba Sherman was really a witch. She was only suspected to be one, but the suspicions only intensified when an infant she was taking care of mysteriously died. The baby was found to have died because of a large sewing needle implanted on its skull. The residents thought that Bathsheba used the baby as sacrificed but the court decided that the evidence against her was not enough to convict her. Still, the public would not be dissuade regarding their thoughts about her.

According to a historian named Mr. McKeachern, Bathsheba did not treat the farmhouse staff that well and she also occasionally hurt them.

Bathsheba Sherman died on May 25, 1885, four years after his son Herbert, married his fiancée Anna.

Legend and local folklore have it hat Bathsheba died from a bizarre form of paralysis or that she turned into stone. There are also rumors that the women had four children, who all died before the age of four. However, her son Herbert survived. As for her other children, there’s only an unofficial record of the children, and their names were supposed to be Julia (1845), Edward (1847), and George (1853).

Bathsheba Sherman’s grave can be found in historic cemetery in Harrisville, Rhode Island.

BATHSHEBA SHERMAN AND THE HAUNTING OF THE PERRON FAMILY

Ed and Lorraine Warren were the ones who suggested that the spirit of Bathsheba Sherman might be haunting the family. Carolyn Perron once suffered from a piercing pain in her calf and intents muscle spasm. When she checked her leg, she saw a puddle of blood on the hurt area. Carolyn could not find anything that might have caused her injury.

Carolyn told the story to Ed and Lorraine, and Lorraine suspected that Bathsheba might have hurt her from the afterlife. That prompted Lorraine to refer to the demonic presence in the house as Bathsheba.

THE REAL PERRON HOME

The real Perron house was not utilized during the production of the movie. The one used in the film was constructed on a sound stage in Wilmington, North Carolina.

The real farmhouse depicted by The Conjuring, or the Old Arnold Estate, is located in Harrisville, Rhode Island. The house and the barn both still stand until today. After struggling with their business, the Perron family sold some of their property. They were left with 8.5 acres of land.

The farmhouse was also called with other names, including the Old Brook Farm and Dexter Richardson House. At present, it is owned by Norma Sutcliffe and Gerry Nelfrich. They bear no relation with the Perron family.

THE PEOPLE WHO DIED ON THE FARMHOUSE

Eight generations of one extended family lived and died in the house before the Perron family arrived. Andrea Perron added that it seemed that some of those people never really left. Two people hanged themselves on the property, one committed suicide by poison, an eleven-year old Prudence Arnold was raped and murdered there, two people drowned, and four men supposedly froze to death.

Records show that most of the people who died on the farmhouse were part of the Arnold family, even Bathsheba. However, it seemed that Prudence did not die in Rhode Island but in Uxbridge, Massachusetts.

PERRON’S KNOWLEDGE ON THE HAUNTED ARNOLD ESTATE HOUSE

The Perron family did not know that the house on the Arnold Estate was haunted, and the seller was not really required to inform them about it. However, Andrea Perron mentioned in her book that the man who sold his father the house told him to always leave the lights at night.

THE OTHER OWNERS OF THE PERRON FAMILY FARMHOUSE

It seemed that every family who lived in the Perron family farmhouse experienced something supernatural during their stay there. Some left the house screaming and running for their lives. There was this man who was supposed to live there for the restoration but he just up and left screaming without anything on him. He did not even bring his car and tools with him when he left. Other people experienced bad things and the house was left vacant for years.

The current owners of the house say that the only things that they have experienced so far are the banging of the door in the front hall, sounds of people talking in other rooms, sounds of footsteps, opening of a door, and the vibration of the husband’s chair in the study. Normal claim to have seen a blue light shooting across the bed room. Meanwhile, Gerry said that he once saw a fog inside their home. Norma is being scientific about things and she does not want to jump at conclusions right away. Since the release of The Conjuring, a lot of people have bothered them. Thus, Norma decided to find evidence that could disprove the Perrons’ and the movie’s story.

Normal also told Andrea Perron that the minister who had lived in their home did not experience anything supernatural. The real Lorrain Warren said that the minister did not spoke anything about it because of his profession.

THE REAL CONJURING DOLL

There really was a haunted doll, but it was involved in another case of Ed and Lorrain and had nothing to do with the Perron family.

The story of Annabelle doll started when the nursing student, Donna, received a Raggedy Ann Doll from her mother. Afterward, Donna and her roommate, Angie, noticed that the doll seemed to be able of changing positions and moving on its own. They also saw the messages on the parchment paper, which seemed to be written by a child. The roommates thought that the writings were made by the doll. Then one night, their friend, Lou, came to stay the night, and he claimed that the doll tried to strangle him. Lou also thought that the doll created the bloody claw-like scratches on his chest.

During a séance, it was found out that the doll was possessed by a young girl named Annabelle, who lived on the previous property where the apartments were built. At seven years old, Annabelle’s dead body was found on the premises of the apartment.

Ed and Lorraine Warren investigated the matter and they decided to perform an exorcism. Donna requested to the couple to bring the doll along with them. Ed and Lorraine still have the doll at present.

THE MAKING OF THE CONJURING

The Conjuring was an ongoing project for 20 years. Ed Warren first played his tapes of his interview with Carolyn Perron for the producer Tony DeRose-Grund. Meanwhile, DeRosa-Grund recorded his conversation with Ed. He claimed that he did not what he would with Ed’s material if they could not make it into a movie.

DeRose-Grund took the risk with the case of Carolyn Perron, claiming that the woman was either insane or she was just very much scared. She was scared.